Repetidor Wifi

Getting IT Done

Linksys WRT54G in Repeater Mode
You do begin to run into bottlenecks as your Internet speeds increase, and as you introduce obstructions between the routers. When deciding where to place both your router and your repeater, it's important to put them both in a central location, and not to keep the repeater too far away from the main router—if you put the repeater on the very edge of your main network hoping to strengthen the signal to your devices, you're going to reduce the speed of your connection to the rest of the network and to the Internet. One can't be held responsible for what one's neighbors name their wireless networks. One router in a well-chosen location can broadcast a signal just about everywhere, but distance or interference can get in the way of that signal. Several sources claim that although you can increase the transmit power to mW the practical limit is around 82mW.

Securifi's Almond touchscreen router is one of many ways to expand your network.

Extending your network’s range with a wireless repeater

Some higher-end routers include this functionality already, but you can easily install third-party firmware like DD-WRT on a cheap router to give it the ability to act as a repeater as well—just check their list of supported devices and read the installation instructions before you buy. There are also shortcomings to that approach, however.

For the vast majority of the population that isn't comfortable with the idea of hacking into their router and following a convoluted series of instructions to upgrade the firmware, it's a process that can easily lead to a useless, bricked piece of hardware.

For those people, I might recommend the recently released Securifi Almond touchscreen router , which we'll be using for our benchmarking later on full disclosure: Securifi sent Ars a unit for review.

The Almond also lacks support for IPv6, a feature not in wide use currently but one that is becoming increasingly important Securifi told me that IPv6 and a few other features and bug fixes will be included in a firmware update next month. For that price, if you're looking for raw speed, you have a number of better options: All are stronger routers than the Almond, making the touchscreen router a tough sell if you aren't scared of a Web interface.

What the Almond does do is put wireless repeating capabilities fully within reach of basically anyone who has ever connected to a wireless network before. Most of its basic configuration—including wireless repeater setup—is handled via its Metro-esque touchscreen, so configuring it as a repeater is a far cry from the multi-step nightmare that DD-WRT would be for a normal person.

Using a router as a repeater is a great way to extend wireless range without investing too much of your money or time, but there are a few technical issues you should be aware of. When deciding where to place both your router and your repeater, it's important to put them both in a central location, and not to keep the repeater too far away from the main router—if you put the repeater on the very edge of your main network hoping to strengthen the signal to your devices, you're going to reduce the speed of your connection to the rest of the network and to the Internet.

You also want to try not to daisy chain repeaters—while it's completely possible to have a second repeater repeating the signal of your first repeater phew , it compounds the performance issues—if you've got so much space to cover that you need multiple repeaters, set your router up in a central location and connect the repeaters directly to it rather than each other. DD-WRT is a fully feature-packed alternative firmware for your router. There are three settings of interest, the first being TX Power.

This is the broadcasting power of your transmitting antenna. The default is a safe value of 70, but we can kick it up a bit. Most people report that jumping up to a is safe. Pushing it higher can cause excessive heat which can damage your router. Use your common sense and discretion. Next up is the Afterburner setting. Finally, we get to Bluetooth Coexistence Mode.

This is typically a result of a bad firmware flash. To avoid bricking always follow instructions carefully. There are times when you may have to use TFTP to flash the router. It is very easy to use and has saved me several times. Always follow instructions carefully. A very good guide by Aaron Weiss with step by step instructions and screen captures is provided here.

Several sources claim that although you can increase the transmit power to mW the practical limit is around 82mW. Anything beyond increases the noise in the signal. There may be some legal considerations regarding signal strength depending on the country you live in. At any time I can see more networks with my card than I can with the router.

I suspect that this is just how the things are with the hardware that Linksys uses. Based on observation the connection speed when in repeater mode is roughly a half of what I can get connecting to the source network directly. This makes sense to me but I have seen writings that claim that this should not be the case with repeaters.

Boosting Your Signal